Some Charter Cable Subscribers May Lose MTV, Comedy Central, and Nickelodeon

Along with Comedy Central and Nickelodeon.

Viacom, the owner of MTV, Comedy Central and Nickelodeon, said on Wednesday it was unable to come to a distribution deal with Charter Communications as part of its ongoing negotiations with the cable television distributor.

Charter’s Spectrum subscribers may see a disruption in service, Viacom said in a statement.

Earlier this year, Charter moved Viacom’s viab flagship networks to its most expensive programming tier, a move that threatened the media company’s affiliate and advertising revenue.

A spokesman for Charter chtr did not immediately return calls outside of business hours.

Tech

Security firm finds some Macs vulnerable to 'firmware' attacks

(Reuters) – Since 2015, Apple Inc (AAPL.O) has tried to protect its Mac line of computers from a form of hacking that is extremely hard to detect, but it has not been entirely successful in getting the fixes to its customers, according to research released on Friday by Duo Security.

Duo examined what is known as firmware in the Mac computers. Firmware is an in-built kind of software that is even more basic than an operating system like Microsoft Windows or macOS.

When a computer is first powered on — before the operating system has even booted up — firmware checks to make sure that basic components like a hard disk and processor are present and tells them what to do. That makes malicious code hiding in it hard to spot.

In most cases, firmware is a hassle to update with the latest security patches. Updates have to be carried out separately from the operating system updates that are more commonplace.

In 2015, Apple started bundling firmware updates along with operating system updates for Mac machines in an effort to ensure firmware on them stayed up to date.

But Duo surveyed 73,000 Mac computers operating in the real world and found that 4.2 percent of them were not running the firmware they should have been based on their operating system. In some models – such as the 21.5-inch iMac released in late 2015 – 43 percent of machines had out-of-date firmware.

That left many Macs open to hacks like the “Thunderstrike” attack, where hackers can control a Mac after plugging an Ethernet adapter into the machine’s so-called thunderbolt port.

Paradoxically, it was only possible to find the potentially vulnerable machines because Apple is the only computer maker that has sought to make firmware updates part of its regular software updates, making it both more trackable and the best in the industry for firmware updates, Rich Smith, director of research and development at Duo, told Reuters in an interview.

Duo said that it had informed Apple of its findings before making them public on Friday. In a statement, Apple said it was aware of the issue and is moving to address it.

”Apple continues to work diligently in the area of firmware security, and we’re always exploring ways to make our systems even more secure,“ the company said in a statement. ”In order to provide a safer and more secure experience in this area, macOS High Sierra automatically validates Mac firmware weekly.”

Reporting by Stephen Nellis; Editing by Leslie Adler

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Why Apple iOS 11 Won’t Run Some of Your Apps

After users download iOS 11 to their iPhones and iPads starting today, they might discover some of their apps no longer work.

Apple’s iOS 11 will not support slow and old apps that use a technology called 32-bit, rendering those programs useless. Additionally, Apple will not allow users to find 32-bit apps in its App Store, effectively killing them off until the app developers update their older apps to support the new 64-bit process, which speeds up apps and makes them more usable on newer iPhones and iPads.

When users download iOS 11, they’ll get a notification from the operating system, saying that a particular app “needs to be updated.” Apple’s notification says that the app “will not work with iOS 11” and it will be banned from use until it’s updated.

Apple (aapl) started to use 64-bit apps in 2013 after the company launched the iPhone 5S, the first smartphone from the company to come with a 64-bit processor. At that time, Apple pressured developers to start taking advantage of the faster chip technology, but still allowed 32-bit apps to be developed and brought to its App Store. In 2015, however, Apple announced that all new apps and updates would need to run on 64-bit.

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While the majority of app developers heeded Apple’s warning and updated their programs, there are still some that have not, which means they haven’t been updated in over two years.

Apple announced last year that it would start to inform users of older and outdated apps, and this year, decided to finally stop supporting the older programs. Since last year, users have only been informed that their older apps would “slow down” their devices but Apple would allow them to be used. Now, though, Apple has seen enough and is stopping them in their tracks.

Apple’s iOS 11 will be available for download starting today. The software is free and users will get a notification on their iPhones and iPads when it’s ready to be downloaded.

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