China says unlikely to grant licenses for world's hottest video game

BEIJING (Reuters) – China’s content regulator on Monday said it was unlikely to grant licenses for the world’s hottest video game, PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds, as being too bloody and violent, thus effectively denying firms the opportunity to cash in.

The ban on the South Korea-made multiplayer game, whose players kill to be the last survivor, is the latest bid to cleanse internet content, after President Xi Jinping painted a vision of China as a culturally confident rejuvenated great power in a speech this month to the Communist Party Congress.

The game’s gladiator-like battle “severely deviates from the socialist core value and the Chinese traditional culture and moral rule,” the China Audio-Video and Digital Publishing Association said in a statement on its website.

Its ethos also goes against the psychological and physical health of juvenile consumers, it added.

The association, grouped under the umbrella of China’s top content regulator, the State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television, said SAPPRFT took a negative view of the game and others of the same kind, and any licenses for it were unlikely.

Reuters’ telephone calls to the games publisher, Bluehole Inc., to seek comment, went unanswered.

Leading Chinese gaming and social media company Tencent Holding Ltd., which hinted on its verified site on China’s Twitter-like Weibo that it might introduce the game on its WeGame platform, did not respond to requests for comment.

Still, Chinese gamers can access the game through overseas gaming platforms, though the association, in its statement on Monday, said Chinese companies should not seek to research, develop and import such games.

Gaming platforms and live streaming sites should not provide promotion and advertisement services to such games, it added.

Audiovisual content featuring topics ranging from drug addiction to homosexuality and incest should be restricted, a government-affiliated entity said in June.

China also bans a number of American television shows, such as “The Big Bang Theory” and “House of Cards”.

Reporting by Pei Li and Adam Jourdan; Editing by Clarence Fernandez

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Tech

Wal-Mart tests direct-to-fridge; Amazon ups restaurant game

(Reuters) – Wal-Mart Stores Inc is testing a service to stock groceries directly to customers’ refrigerators as it seeks to take on e-commerce giant Amazon.com.

The delivery of groceries and meal kits is emerging as the next frontier of competition among retailers.

The world’s biggest brick-and-mortar retailer said on Friday it is partnering with August Home, a provider of smart locks and home accessories, to test the service with certain customers in the Silicon Valley. (bit.ly/2ffqqvT)

The grocery business is set to be upended through Amazon’s acquisition of upmarket grocer Whole Foods last month and the online retailer is also entrenching itself more deeply in the restaurants business.

Amazon Restaurants on Friday teamed up with online food ordering company Olo whose network of restaurants includes Applebee’s and Chipotle.

A Wal-Mart Stores Inc company distribution center in Bentonville, Arkansas June 6, 2013. REUTERS/Rick Wilking

The partnership will help Olo’s restaurant customers connect with Amazon’s delivery services.

The competition in the meal-kits business is also heating up. Supermarket operator Albertsons Cos Inc said it would buy meal-kit delivery service Plated while rival Kroger-owned Ralphs started selling meal kits in stores this week.

ONE-TIME PASSCODE DELIVERY

As part of the test, Wal-Mart delivery persons gain access to a customer’s house using a pre-authorized one-time passcode and put away groceries in the fridge and other items in the foyer.

Homeowners would receive notifications when the delivery is in progress and could also watch the real-time process from their home security cameras through the August Home app.

The Bentonville, Arkansas-based retailer has been exploring new methods of delivery and in June said it was testing using its own store employees to deliver packages ordered online.

Reporting by Vibhuti Sharma and Sruthi Ramakrishnan in Bengaluru; Editing by Martina D’Couto

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Tech

‘Pepper’ robot uses trial-and-error learning to master a child’s game


Robots, much like children, are now using simple games to learn important skills. Pepper, SoftBank’s adorable humanoid robot, recently learned to play ball-in-a-cup (also called ring and pin) in an effort to better understand optimal trajectory. In the beginning, SoftBank’s team demonstrated the game to the robot by guiding its arm. By the end of the video below, Pepper no longer required their assistance. It took 100 tries, but each failed attempt left Pepper to analyze and try to improve upon past performance, much like a human. After each failed attempt, the robot attempted to alter the movement slightly in an…

This story continues at The Next Web


All articles

I can’t get enough of this unofficial Stranger Things game


If you haven’t yet seen Netflix’s excellent new show, Stranger Things, I envy you. I watched the entire season in a single day and now wish I could turn back time to binge it afresh. To pay tribute to the series, indie game developer Infamous Quests created a lovely little point-and-click adventure that puts you in the shoes of Chief Hopper as he searches the forest for the missing Will Byers.   The free title is available for Mac, Windows and Linux. You can talk to officers officers Powell and Callahan and Byers’ teacher, Mr. Clarke, as you take in…

This story continues at The Next Web


All articles

HBO just confirmed the popular Game of Thrones ‘R+L = J’ fan theory


If you’re keeping up with your Game of Thrones theories, you likely know about ‘R+L = J,’ which is not a screwy math problem. At least as the TV show goes, it’s been confirmed by HBO’s ‘Making Game of Thrones’ blog. If you’re not sure what R+L = J is, it’s surprisingly simple (for Game of Thrones, at least). In a nutshell, it means that Rhaegar Targaryen (R) and Lyanna Stark (L) are Jon Snow’s real parents (J). In the show, we see that Lyanna Stark is Jon Snow’s mother, but HBO tried to obfuscate her telling Ned who the father…

This story continues at The Next Web


All articles

This Slack bot turns everyday conversation into a game of numbers


If you’ve been looking for new ways to liven up discussions with your team on Slack, this bot might be just what you need. Scorebot is a fun chatbot integration for Slack that lets you turn everyday conversation into a fierce competition of numbers. Once Scorebot is invited to a channel, it’ll let users assign positive or negative point values via emoji allowing you to score authors with the best or worst messages. Whenever someone reacts to a Slack message, Scorebot awards corresponding points to the author, keeping score in a leaderboard everyone in the channel can participate in. Additionally, the bot…

This story continues at The Next Web


All articles

Waste the rest of your day with Facebook Messenger’s hidden basketball game

fb messenger bball
Looks like someone in the Facebook team has caught the March Madness fever; in a small update to the Messenger app, typing in the basketball emoji can enable a secret mini-game between you and a friend. To start, just locate the basketball emoji (copy and paste ????, if you can’t find it in your growing emoji list), send it to a friend and click it to start the game. You’ll get a basketball placed in various locations on your screen, and all you have to do just swipe up toss the ball into the hoop. The goal is to challenge your friend to…

This story continues at The Next Web


Uncategorized


All articles