5 more banks join Apple Pay in Singapore so we can all finally use it

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SINGAPORE — Now many more Apple users here can pay in stores with their iPhones and Apple Watches.

Five banks in the country — DBS, OCBC Bank, POSB, Standard Chartered and UOB — announced on Wednesday they had started to support Apple Pay on their credit and debit cards.

Together with American Express, which launched together with Apple Pay here a little over a month ago, the six banks collectively cover the vast majority of the island’s card users, with over 80% of the cards issued by Visa and MasterCard. Some popular banks like Citibank and Maybank have not yet started supporting the service here. Read more…

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Google introduces Goals, so you can finally become a better person

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Finding it hard to practice Spanish before your next overseas trip? Google wants to help with that.

On Wednesday, the company launched a new feature called Goals in Google Calendar, its iOS and Android app. If you really want to get into meditation, for example, you can follow Goal’s prompts to find the best time to set aside a few tranquil minutes in your busy schedule.

Typical goals include exercise or learning a new skill, but you can customise the feature with your latest resolutions. If you want to find some time to practice mindfulness, Goals would ask how often you need to practice and what times work best before customising your calendar for you.  Read more…

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Google Keep finally arrives on iOS for all your note-taking needs

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Keep – Google’s simple note-taking app – is finally arriving on iOS. It’s the same set of features you’ve come to expect from the Android and Web versions. You can create colored notes and to-do lists, search for information by photo, audio, or text, or add labels to help keep things organized. You can also set reminders based on a time or location so you don’t forget an item from your next shopping list. Of course, it’s connected to the cloud, so your notes will be saved across all your devices, and collaborative functionality means you can share notes with others and work…

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With Dropbox Groups, businesses can finally sort folders based on departments

Dropbox is rolling out a new feature called Groups and a related API that should make it easier for businesses to manage all of their content stored in Dropbox, the file-sync-and share company is set to reveal on Thursday.

The new feature is now available for Dropbox for Business customers and was supposedly the most requested feature Dropbox customers — now hovering at over 100,000 businesses — were calling for, explained Dropbox product manager Waseem Daher in an interview.

Groups supposedly lets users create folders that only members of the appropriate group should have access to. The idea is that businesses can set up folders based on their departments and then assign the right staff members to those folders, said Daher. Now, marketing departments can create folders that contain their related documents and only sales and marketing staff should be able to touch them.

If a company hires a new salesperson, that new employee will “just need to be added to the sales group and they will automatically get access to all the content they need for the job,” said Daher. The new Groups interface will supposedly give IT administrators a central hub to manage all those employees in one place, and if a company wants, it can set up group owners with the ability to manage those folders as opposed to only IT staff.

The new Group API that’s also being released is similar to the recently launched Dropbox for Business API in that the API will give developers a chance to create custom applications or modifications to the new Groups feature per the needs of their organizations.

Daher said the biggest feature developers could create with the new API would be a custom integration with their organizations’ active directory, which some IT admins use to keep track of where all their company resources, user data and related items are be located.

Additionally, a bunch of identity-management and security startups — including Okta, OneLogin and Ping Identity — are all working on their own integrations with the new Group API, which makes sense because these startups are aiming to protect companies from rouge employees who may try sneaking into places they shouldn’t be. All of these startups have some sort of integration with active directory as part of their own technology, so the hope is that with the Group API they can just “mirror that right into Dropbox,” said Daher.

The new Groups feature is another example of how Dropbox has been busy morphing from a cloud storage repository into more of a workplace hub, similar to the company’s rival Box.

For these cloud storage startups to grow and court big enterprise clients, they need to show that they have more to offer than just a place to hold documents, as exemplified by the similar file-sync-and-share startup Egnyte moving into the data analytics space.

With Dropbox Groups, businesses can finally sort folders based on departments originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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