Amazon says studio executive Joe Lewis resigns

(Reuters) – Amazon.com Inc on Monday said Joe Lewis, the head of comedy and drama at its entertainment studio unit, has stepped down, but gave no reason for his resignation.

FILE PHOTO: Joe Lewis, Head of Original Programming at Amazon Studios, poses during Amazon’s premiere screening of the tv series “Transparent” at the Ace Hotel in downtown Los Angeles, California, September 15, 2014. REUTERS/Kevork Djansezian

Amazon said Sharon Tal Yguado, who is the head of event series, will replace Lewis in the interim.

Lewis’ exit comes after Amazon Studios chief Roy Price resigned this month after taking a leave of absence in the wake of harassment allegations from a female producer.

The Hollywood Reporter, which earlier reported Lewis’ departure, said Lewis will still have a producing deal at Amazon Studios.

Reporting by Shubham Kalia in Bengaluru and Jeffrey Dastin in San Francisco; Editing by Mary Milliken

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Equifax reviews its top lawyer's role in executive stock sales: WSJ

(Reuters) – Equifax Inc is reviewing its Chief Legal Officer John Kelly’s involvement in stock sales by company executives made weeks before the credit-reporting service disclosed a massive data breach, the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday.

Three senior executives including the company’s chief financial officer sold $ 1.8 million in shares within three days of the company learning on July 29 that hackers had breached personal data for up to 143 million Americans.

Kelly had the responsibility for approving the share sales and is also central to broader questions facing the Equifax’s board because he is responsible for security at the company, the WSJ reported, citing people familiar with the matter. on.wsj.com/2fE8fAf

Kelley had broad responsibilities beyond legal services in his position at Equifax that differed from peers at rival credit-reporting companies, WSJ said.

Equifax was not immediately available for comment.

In a letter to the U.S. House of Representatives, made public on Friday, Equifax said its board of directors has formed a special committee to review the stock sales.

The data breach was disclosed publicly on Sept. 7 and has since sparked a public outcry, government investigations, a sharp drop in the company’s share price and a management shake-up.

Reporting by Ismail Shakil in Bengaluru; Editing by Sandra Maler

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Exclusive: Royal Bank of Canada using blockchain for U.S./Canada payments – executive

TORONTO (Reuters) – Royal Bank of Canada (RY.TO) is experimenting with blockchain to help move payments between its U.S. and Canadian banks, one of the bank’s senior executives told Reuters on Thursday.

Martin Wildberger, RBC’s executive vice president for innovation and technology, said use of distributed ledger technology, or DLT, would improve the speed of payments, reduce complexity and lower costs.

The bank developed the system over the past six months at an RBC blockchain technology center in Toronto, deploying software developed by a cross-industry open-source blockchain consortium known as Hyperledger.

The technology was integrated into RBC’s existing systems several weeks ago as a “shadow” to RBC’s primary ledger, letting the bank monitor payments in real-time as they travel between the United States and Canada, he said.

“We wanted to set it up as a shadow ledger so that we can demonstrate our leadership in exploiting that technology while at the same time recognizing that the technology is still early in its adoption phase,” Wildberger said.

Blockchain emerged in 2009 as the system underpinning the cryptocurrency bitcoin, allowing people to quickly and anonymously exchange electronic currency. It is a shared ledger of transactions maintained by a network of computers rather than a central authority.

Investors have since put billions of dollars into developing blockchain, betting the technology could make banking operations faster, more efficient and more transparent.

Although concerns remain about the legitimacy of bitcoin, which JP Morgan (JP.N) Chief Executive Jamie Dimon described as a fraud earlier this month, the credibility of the blockchain technology itself has increased.

A growing number of senior bankers have said they believe it will eventually revolutionize the way payments are made across the industry, reducing complexity and costs of back-office processes.

“Everybody recognizes blockchain will be transformative and critical,” said Wildberger. “At the same point in time, I think everybody recognizes these are early days.”

RBC is looking to use blockchain to improve its rewards and loyalty offers and trade finance capabilities, he said.

Canada’s central bank said in May that it had decided against using blockchain to provide the underlying infrastructure for the country’s interbank payment system after a year-long investigation, saying “too many hurdles” had to be overcome to make the approach viable.

Reporting by Matt Scuffham; Editing by Jim Finkle

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