General Electric: Dividend Cut?

General Electric’s (GE) shares fell to fresh 52-week lows last week as investors continue to be negative about the industrial company. While negative analyst commentary and concerns over General Electric’s dividend sustainability have more heavily weighed on investor sentiment lately, I think General Electric makes for an interesting contrarian ‘Buy’ today.

General Electric is not in an enviable position, and neither are shareholders that bought into the industrial company at a much higher valuation in the past. General Electric’s shares have slumped 27.3 percent year-to-date, falling to one new low after another. Last week, General Electric hit a new 52-week low @$ 22.83, extending a multi-week streak of losses.

See for yourself.

Source: StockCharts.com

A couple of factors have weighed on investor sentiment lately, including negative analyst commentary from JPMorgan that suggested General Electric might have to cut its dividend. According to a CNBC report, analysts at JPMorgan see a GE dividend cut as “increasingly likely”.

Not only did JPMorgan fuel the fire of doubt when it comes to General Electric’s dividend sustainability but the investment bank also lowered its price target for GE’s shares from $ 22 to $ 20, maintaining its firm ‘underweight’ rating on the stock. In addition, widely-followed media and investment personality Jim Cramer last week suggested that General Electric likely will cut guidance and may slash the dividend.

Given General Electric’s core industrial business weakness – keep in mind that GE’s industrial revenues slumped 12 percent and industrial/vertical EPS dropped 45 percent year on year in the second quarter on the back of a weak performance in oil & gas as well as transportation – a guidance revision is a distinct possibility, especially as it relates to GE’s industrial operating profit and margin guidance.

Source: General Electric

The real question, however, is whether General Electric will take the rather significant step and slash its dividend.

General Electric has cut its dividend in the past. The last time General Electric slashed its dividend payout was during the Great Recession when a lot of companies cut back on shareholder payments. In 2009, General Electric cut its quarterly cash dividend from $ 0.31/share to $ 0.10/share. However, GE’s dividend rate consistently edged up over the last eight years. General Electric’s long-term dividend history is impressive.

Source: General Electric

Will General Electric Have To Cut Its Dividend?

I don’t think General Electric will have to cut its dividend, although management could decide that it is better for the company to conserve cash and invest in General Electric’s industrial businesses directly. That said, here is why I think a dividend cut is relatively unlikely.

For one thing, General Electric has affirmed investors multiple times that the dividend is a ‘top priority’ for management. This statement suggests that management will remain committed to paying shareholders a steady dividend even though it costs the company a lot of cash. Remember that General Electric plans to return $ 8 billion in dividends to shareholders this year alone.

Further, I think General Electric will be able to maintain its dividend from a cash flow perspective.

General Electric has guided for $ 16-20 billion in free cash flow, including dispositions in 2017. A large part of this cash flow is contributed by GE Capital, which is expected to produce $ 6-7 billion in dividends for GE this year. In the first six months of 2017, GE Capital has already beefed up General Electric’s cash flow by $ 4 billion, making up for a significant portion of General Electric’s dividends to shareholders.

GE Capital dividends indeed play a crucial role in propping up General Electric’s cash flow. General Electric’s industrial free cash flow excluding deal taxes and pension expenses was actually negative $ 1.6 billion year to date, and total FCF only turned positive because of GE Capital’s dividend to the parent company. Shareholder dividends therefore depend largely on GE Capital’s cash flow, while GE’s industrial business on a standalone basis does not have the cash power right now to fund those payments.

Source: General Electric

I don’t think that General Electric will have to cut its dividend, though. General Electric has guided for $ 19-21 billion in capital returns this year of which only $ 8 billion are cash (and recurring). In other words, as long as GE can fall back on GE Capital for its dividend payments and the company cuts back on share buybacks, there is no immediate need to cut the dividend.

Your Takeaway

General Electric could adjust its dividend payout. Yes, but I consider this not that likely considering past management statements that the dividend is a ‘top priority’ and considering that GE Capital produces a LOT of cash for General Electric. General Electric has an impressive long-term dividend history which signals its commitment to shareholders, and I doubt management wants to put off investors with another dividend cut. I think investors are a bit too fearful right now, which is exactly the right time to get greedy. Buy for long-term dividend income and capital appreciation.

If you like to read more of my articles, and like to be kept up to date with the companies I cover, I kindly ask you that you scroll to the top of this page and click ‘follow‘. I am largely investing in dividend paying stocks, but also venture out occasionally and cover special situations that offer appealing reward-to-risk ratios and have potential for significant capital appreciation. Above all, my immediate investment goal is to achieve financial independence.

Disclosure: I am/we are long GE.

I wrote this article myself, and it expresses my own opinions. I am not receiving compensation for it (other than from Seeking Alpha). I have no business relationship with any company whose stock is mentioned in this article.

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As Ford pushes into electric vehicles, U.S. union aims to save jobs

DETROIT (Reuters) – The United Auto Workers is talking with Ford Motor Co (F.N) about ways to avoid layoffs as the No. 2 U.S. automaker builds more electric vehicles, a senior union official told Reuters on Thursday.

Ford told investors Tuesday it planned to slash $ 14 billion in costs over the next five years and shift investments away from internal combustion engines and sedans to develop more trucks, plus electric and hybrid cars.

“We’ve been doing our due diligence to find out how much it (electrification) means to us,” UAW Vice President Jimmy Settles, head of the union’s Ford department said in a telephone interview. “We put them on notice early on that we want to be part of this process.”

“Up to this point they (Ford) have been agreeable that it’s in the best interest of the company and also our members for us to be part of the process,” he added.

Ford’s push into electric comes after Detroit rival General Motors Co (GM.N) unveiled plans to add 20 new battery electric and fuel cell vehicles to its global lineup by 2023.

Ford’s presentation to investors this week under new chief executive Jim Hackett, included a slide touting a 30 percent reduction in “hours per unit” to build electric vehicles.

Fewer hours mean fewer workers.

German automaker Daimler AG (DAIGn.DE) warned last month that electric Mercedes models would initially be just half as profitable as conventional alternatives – forcing the group to find savings by outsourcing more component manufacturing, which may in turn threaten German jobs.

The UAW’s Settles said he had met one-on-one with Hackett, a former CEO of office furniture maker Steelcase Inc (SCS.N) and in a meeting with union leaders in recent weeks.

He said Hackett’s message had been that he wants to find new opportunities for UAW workers as electrification evolves.

“The assembly may be different, but he’s not looking to eliminate any jobs,” Settles said of Hackett. “He’s been consistent in what he’s saying and I‘m optimistic he means it.”

The UAW vice president said the union and automaker had assembled teams to discuss future jobs, including for production workers and skilled trades workers, Settles said.

Settles said Ford’s announcement in March that it would invest $ 200 million on a new data center in Michigan could create new union-represented, technology-related jobs.

“We need further communications on what it means in terms of jobs,” he said.

Ford has completed 85 percent of its 2015 union contract target of creating or retaining 8,500 union jobs by 2019 and could hit 100 percent by the end of 2017, Settles said.

A Ford spokeswoman said the company and the UAW are in “constant communications about the business.”

Reporting by Nick Carey; Editing by Andrew Hay

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Tech

Ford creates team to ramp up electric vehicle development

(Reuters) – Ford Motor Co has formed a team to accelerate global development of electric vehicles, an executive said on Monday.

One aim of Ford’s “Team Edison” is to identify and develop electric-vehicle partnerships with other companies, including suppliers, in some global markets, according to Sherif Marakby, vice president of autonomous vehicles and electrification.

Marakby said the group will be based in the Detroit area and work with regional Ford electrification teams in China and Europe.

The team will report to Ted Cannis, who has been named global director of electrification.

Reporting by Paul Lienert in Detroit; Editing by Jeffrey Benkoe

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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