Cisco nears deal to acquire BroadSoft: source

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Cisco Systems Inc, the world’s largest networking gear manufacturer, is nearing a deal to buy U.S. telecommunications software firm BroadSoft Inc for close to $ 2 billion, a person familiar with the matter said on Sunday.

A newly installed phone made by Cisco is shown in San Diego, California, U.S., April 17, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake

The deal, which comes after Reuters first reported in August that BroadSoft was exploring a sale, would allow Cisco to further diversify away from its stagnating switches and routers business by giving it a stronger foothold in selling unified communications software to big telecommunications firms.

If deal negotiations are completed successfully, Cisco’s agreement to buy BroadSoft could be announced as early as Monday, the source said, asking not to be identified because the deal discussions are confidential.

Cisco declined to comment. BroadSoft did not immediately return a request for comment. Bloomberg News reported earlier on Sunday that Cisco was close to a deal to acquire BroadSoft.

With its traditional business of making switches and routers seeing revenue declines, Cisco, like other legacy technology firms, has been focusing on high-growth areas such as security, the Internet of Things and cloud computing.

The BroadSoft deal would be Cisco’s second major acquisition this year following the $ 3.7 billion acquisition of privately-held AppDynamics Inc in March.

BroadSoft shares had closed at $ 54.90 on Friday, giving the company a market capitalization of $ 1.67 billion.

Based in Gaithersburg, Maryland, BroadSoft provides software and services that enable mobile, fixed-line and cable service providers to offer unified communications over their internet protocol networks.

BroadSoft has historically sold its products to large telecommunications companies such as Verizon Communications Inc and AT&T Inc, which then resell the software to their business customers.

BroadSoft has recently tried to revamp its business model to sell directly to these customers, a move that risks its relationships with its telecommunications partners, according to a Barclays Plc research report.

New York-based hedge fund P2 Capital Partners LLC owned a 4.6 percent stake in BroadSoft as of the end of June, according to Thomson Reuters data. P2 has often behaved as an activist shareholder and has even offered to buy companies in which it has invested.

Another BroadSoft shareholder with a history of acquisitions is buyout firm KKR & Co LP, which is BroadSoft’s 13th-largest shareholder, according to Thomson Reuters data.

Reporting by Liana B. Baker in San Francisco; editing by Diane Craft

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EU ready to move alone on digital tax if no global deal

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – The European Commission said the EU should proceed with an overhaul of taxes on digital firms even if the rest of the rich world did not follow suit, a draft report said.

The document is part of an EU push to tap more revenues from online multinationals such as Amazon and Facebook, who are accused of paying too little tax in Europe by routing most of their profits to low-rate countries such as Ireland or Luxembourg.

The draft report, to be adopted on Thursday, said that on average brick-and-mortar multinationals pay in taxes in the EU more than twice what their digital competitors do.

Traditional large firms face a median 23.2 percent tax rate, while digital giants do not pay more than 10.1 percent – and when they sell directly to customers, rather than to firms, their effective rate goes down to 8.9 percent, data cited by the Commission showed.

An earlier report by a European lawmaker said EU states may have lost in tax revenues up to 5.4 billion euros ($ 6.5 billion) just from Facebook and Google, now part of Alphabet, between 2013 and 2015.

“A level playing field is a pre-condition for all businesses to be able to innovate, develop and grow,” the Commission said, adding that fairer taxation of the digital economy was urgently needed.

Partly because of the uneven taxation, revenues in the EU retail sector grew on average by only 1 percent a year between 2008 and 2016, while in the same period revenues of the top-five online retailers, such as Amazon, grew on average by 32 percent per year, the Commission’s report says.


The document, seen by Reuters, will be presented at a summit of EU leaders on September 29 dedicated to digital issues. Despite divergences and scepticism among some smaller states, the 28 EU countries are expected to find common ground on digital taxation by December.

The Commission is seeking a compromise among rich countries worldwide in a bid to reduce opposition from EU states that fear losing competitiveness if the EU moves ahead on its own in this field.

But “in the absence of adequate global progress, EU solutions should be advanced within the single market”, the document said, adding that a legislative proposal may be presented in the spring regardless of global developments.

The best way to tackle distortions would be to review the notion of “permanent establishment” so that firms could be taxed also in countries where they do not have a physical presence, the Commission said.

At the moment online companies can often avoid paying taxes in countries where they generate large revenues because they do not have a physical presence there.

A proposal to change the corporate tax base is already under discussion in the EU. The Commission believes it represents “a basis to address these key challenges”, but needs the unanimous support of EU states to turn the plan into law.

To move ahead more quickly, the Commission said short-term solutions could be considered. They include an “equalization” tax on turnover, as proposed by France and backed by 10 EU countries, the report said.

Alternative short-term options would be a withholding tax on payments to digital businesses and a levy on revenues from advertisements or other services provided by digital firms.

But short-term options “have pros and cons, and further work is needed”, the Commission said, warning that they may go against double-taxation treaties, state aid rules, fundamental freedoms and EU international commitments under free trade agreements and the World Trade Organization (WTO).

Reporting by Francesco Guarascio @fraguarascio; Editing by Philip Blenkinsop and Gareth Jones

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.